Viva la Vedo

Monday 15th April 2019 – Guy’s Hospital – Gastroenterology

The Vedolizumab Decision

(This post records an important discussion prior to the next stage of my Crohn’s treatment)

The gastro clinic at GSTT is a victim of its own success. Once a patient gets referred there they invariably don’t want to return to their original hospital. As a result clinics run late. I guess they must be overbooked to cope with the numbers. But forewarned is forearmed so I always take something to read. Having registered with reception I settled down with my book. A nurse appeared and apologised that the doctors were running 75 minutes late. I wondered if there would be time to go and get a chest x-ray (booked some while ago). It was worth a try. Ten minutes later I was back in the outpatients’ waiting area with the x-ray complete. Excellent service.

When you get called into the “inner” waiting room you know it won’t be too long until you see the consultant. I asked the nurse to put a note on my folder that I wished to see my usual doctor. After a few minutes he was calling my name. As I entered the consulting room I had a list of questions in my hand as an aide-memoire.

Capsule Endoscopy Report

He asked if I had received a copy of the capsule endoscopy report. Yes, but didn’t know what I was looking at. He worked his way through the document stopping at any frames of interest – “that looks like an ulcer, and there, and that’s one…..” – the conclusion was mild to moderate inflammation in my small bowel. I asked whether it was possible to work out location of inflammation as I get a pain across my midriff,  just above my belly button. He did not expect that to be where pain would be apparent. I mentioned it seemed worse when wearing a tight belt and explained about the hernia that had been found a couple of weeks previously and how it hurt more since surgeon had “poked around”. Normally a hernia would be put right in a simple operation but due to varices growing in my abdomen the surgeon was not happy to proceed. I had added it to my “on-hold” list – cholecystectomy; hernia repair.

Next he ran down the results of my recent blood test. “You’ve had chickenpox but not glandular fever as no antibodies are present, oh and you haven’t got AIDS but you probably knew that”. I replied that I had a very bad bout of glandular fever at the beginning of my ‘A’ levels, which accounted for why I did so badly. Maybe antibodies disappear over time. I was pleased to see that my Hb had now risen to 11.8. There was another test, looking at protein bands, one of which was marked “insufficient sample provided” which I thought strange as the phlebotomist had taken nine, full to the top, phials last time. I would need need to give a further sample after the appointment.

I outlined my reticence about starting Vedo :

  • Having been Crohn’s drug free for nearly 8 years I was hesitant to re-start
  • Side effects
  • Co-morbidities
  • Infusions. Whilst I like trips to London (at the moment) I might not do so as I get even older

What could happen if I decided not to start Crohn’s drugs? The worst outcome would be the inflammation becoming so advanced that the bowel could perforate or form fistulas and result in emergency surgery. Given that I should try to avoid surgery this sounded like a risk not worth taking.

The side effect profile of Vedo is very good and it is proving very successful. A recent study into its use with Ulcerative Colitis showed better results than expected. I said that I had seen some slides from that presentation as a member of the audience had posted them on Twitter. He seemed a little surprised at this but added “I do talk a lot!

Is Vedo compatible with my co-morbidities – bile acid malabsorption; portal hypertension; thrombocytopenia; gallbladder issues? I do have rather a lot of them. He told me not to be concerned about them and that I must be made of stern stuff as there were many patients at my age who were in a considerably worse state!

With regards to travelling for infusions, a self administered version of Vedo, using compressed air rather than a needle, has been developed and will undergo 2 years of trials. It should be available in 3 years time then no more infusions.

I asked in light of the calprotectin tests, suggesting the inflammation started early in 2016,  if I should have had a capsule endoscopy sooner than October 2018 ”  His response was that the first place to look following raised calprotectin results is lthe arge bowel. My colonoscopies showed nothing. The subsequent small bowel MRI also showed no inflammation. However given my experience he was now favouring earlier intervention with a capsule for other patients.

How would we measure the efficacy of the drug? Regular calprotectin tests throughout the year and at the end of the first twelve months a capsule endoscopy and small bowel MRI. The one thing I didn’t clarify is whether Vedo is taken to get one into remission and then continues as a maintenance dose or if another drug is then substituted.

I said that I wanted to discuss the situation with my wife before making a final decision but was leaving the consultation with a lot more positive thoughts about Vedo than when we started. How would I give the go ahead? “Contact the IBD Helpline and take it form there“. With that we shook hands,  I bade him farewell and headed for the blood test room.

Having weighed up the pros and the cons, and with the additional imperative of avoiding surgery (if at all possible) it would seem to be a no-brainer that I should at least try Vedo to get me back into remission before serious damage is done to my gut.

Now where’s that IBD Helpline number……