Tag Archives: ileostomy

Life Changing

Monday 11th October 2010 – OPERATION DAY

The operation time slipped from the 11:30am originally planned but eventually I was collected from the 12th floor and arrived down in the anaesthesia room at 12:30pm. The theatre team were ready for me and started the preparation procedures. They seemed to be a very happy crew, laughing and joking and that helped put me at my ease.

The anaesthetist I had met earlier then appeared. He greeted me with a broad smile and said he was ready to fit the epidural. Once that was done he said I’m just going to give you a mild sedative to relax you. I just drifted off into oblivion. Never trust an anaesthetist.

That’s the last I remember until waking up at six o’clock in Recovery. It was freezing. I was feeling no pain as the epidural was doing its job well but I was freezing. Shivering. Violently shivering. The house doctor, that I had seen in my room that morning, came up to see how I was. His first word was “Sorry…” so I knew what was coming. He told me it was a four and a half hour operation and that because of what they found when they opened me up it was necessary to have a stoma in order to give my large intestine a chance to recover. He lifted the blankets so I could see what they had done. It didn’t really come as a shock as I always knew it was a possibility and was mentally prepared for it. I can imagine what it would have felt like if I hadn’t been forewarned.

By late afternoon my wife was starting to get concerned. It must be a lot worse for those sitting at home waiting for news than the patient who is comfortably numb. She hadn’t had any news on how the operation went so she rang the Ward. They told here that I hadn’t arrived yet but would call when they knew what was happening. Just gone six thirty a doctor rang to tell her that I was OK. It had been complex surgery and I was still in Recovery.

The Team in Recovery were concerned about my readings, especially the temperature. At one point I had a “bair hugger” put round me which is a hollow blanket into which hot air is blown. Now I know what a formula one tyre goes through on the grid. I was offered a warm drink just a couple of hours after the operation. No more “nil by mouth”. It wasn’t until I was finally wrapped up in a large, microwaveable blanket that my temperature began to return to normal and I could be taken up to the ward. By now it was around eight o’clock.

Another huge change over the past few years is being able to use a mobile phone in hospital. I suppose it was inevitable as people would use them whatever. I asked the nurse if I could get my phone so I could ring my wife. As I explained earlier, they had locked my valuables in the ward safe and the night shift didn’t know the combination. Very frustrating.

I was taken to Northumberland Ward on the 11th floor, where I spent the rest of my stay. I had been expecting to be put in Page Ward, as that was the ward specialising in colorectal surgery. Unfortunately there were no beds available so I was put into the sister ward next door where they specialised in upper GI conditions.

{I felt really good and so could have easily written up my blog if I’d have had my iPad. (I imagine this was a post op high induced by the drugs). I finally managed to get hold of it the following morning to write this post.)

The house doctor came to visit me again to see if there was anything I needed. I asked him if he could ring my wife and tell her I was safely up in the Ward. He had a number of other things to take care of first but eventually she got a call at eleven thirty……..

I said at the top of this post that it was a truly life changing experience. I’ll go into more detail in another post but because of it :

  1. Lost my terminal ileum and gained BAM (bile acid malabsorption)
  2. Got stoma’d
  3. Started my relationship with St.Thomas’ Hospital
  4. Became very laid back about all things medical
  5. …and started blogging

Post Op Note : I never fully understood exactly what the operation involved. Earlier this year I contacted one of the surgeons and using the operation notes and pathology report, he put together this sketch for me.

op-drawing-by-surgeon

You need an operation

This is an extract from the chapter that covers the immediate period before major surgery for a stricture in my terminal ileum.

Friday, 8th October 2010 – X MARKS THE SPOT

My final visit to St.Thomas’s, as an outpatient, before the operation. I had to visit the stoma nurse in case I ended up having to have a bag fitted. Obviously I was hoping that it wouldn’t happen but you need to cover all the bases. As the saying goes ” Sh*t happens”, and it’s quite relevant in this case!

We started by discussing all the implications of being stoma’d. She told me they were not that difficult to deal with and it should only be for 6 months. She then looked at my physique (= bulges) and how I wore my trousers so she could position the stoma in the optimum place. Once she was happy with the location she marked it. I now had a large black cross on the right side of my abdomen, marked with indelible felt pen and covered by a waterproof sticker. I was still hopeful that it would be intact after the operation.

X marks the spot
X marks the spot

I told the nurse that I intended to keep my blog going whilst I was in hospital. She looked rather sceptically at me and said that for the first few days I would have an attention span of about 5 minutes and it was unlikely that I would feel like doing anything. She was partly right.

I asked what time my operation was likely to start. Surgery usually began at 8:00am but until they saw the full list of operations they wouldn’t be able to tell me where I would be in the sequence. They might have a better idea when I was admitted on the Sunday. When we saw the Enhanced Recovery Nurse the previous week she said that the surgeon likes to do his “interesting” patients early morning and that I was one of the “interesting” ones. It brought to mind the Chinese saying/curse “May you live in interesting times”.

From then on it was just a waiting game until Sunday when I would get the call telling me which ward I needed to report to.

Saturday, 9th October 2010 – LAST DAY OF FREEDOM

The last full day of being able to drive for at least six weeks so we decided to go out for the afternoon to see the autumn tints at the National Trust’s Sheffield Park Garden.

In the evening I made a final list of chores that needed to be completed the following day before I got the call from St.Thomas’s telling me which ward to report to and when they wanted me. I decided to see just how far down the list I could get. I was under strict instructions not to leave home until the hospital had rung but had been assured that they would find me a bed and that the op would go ahead on Monday unless the surgeon fell off his bike again. Since he had done that last year they were hoping he had learned his lesson.


Sunday, 10th October 2010 – THE WAITING GAME

I always knew that this day would be the worst in the process so far. The admission letter told me not to leave home until the hospital had contacted me with the name of the ward I was to report to and at what time.

All the chores were completed in the morning and then we waited for the call. It got to half past two and the tension was just too great so I rang the ward I thought I was being admitted to. Rather worryingly I was told that they had no record of me but would do some ringing around and let me know what was happening.

About 10 minutes later I got a call to say that there wasn’t an available bed in Page Ward but I would be expected in Howard Ward instead. They would call me back to confirm when I was needed. We had a quick look at the St.Thomas’s website and couldn’t see Howard Ward listed. More worry.

I then got a call from Howard Ward to say that I could come in as soon as I was ready and that I was getting a single room in the Private wing of the hospital but not to get too comfortable as it was for one night only.

This really was the most stressful time for myself and my wife but as soon as we set off for London I relaxed and then became positively chilled out. Unfortunately it wasn’t so easy for my wife. If anything my laid back attitude made those around me more anxious.

Private Room
My private room – one night only

My sister picked us up and took us down to the station and we all boarded the train to Waterloo. We walked up from the station to St.Thomas’ and arrived just after half past four. Howard Ward is on the twelfth (top) floor of the hospital and entrance is via a set of locked doors. It took a while to find someone to let us in and eventually were greeted by a friendly ward sister who showed us to my room. The first impression was “Wow, what a view” as we looked south down the Thames and over to the Houses of Parliament.

Just before six o’clock I said my goodbyes to my wife and sister, wondering, at the back of my mind, if that would be the last time I would see them. I don’t want to sound over dramatic but it was a possibility. Apart from that one doubt I was remarkably calm and collected (and have been so ever since, no matter what my health has thrown at me. I wish I could pass the secret on to others but it simply happened and not as the result of a conscious effort).

The ward sister returned to check my details, blood pressure and heart rate and take some MRSA swabs. Then we were joined by a doctor who stuck a cannula in the back of my hand and took some blood samples. I was allowed to eat up until midnight but after that it was to be fluids only. My dinner arrived and I ate it whilst watching the river traffic passing up and down the Thames. Mainly pleasure boats packed with people for an evening cruise, taking advantage of the autumn sunshine.

Howard Ward
Ready for dinner

When I had finished my dinner I was connected up to a drip and told to expect another visit from a doctor around 11:00pm.

Once you’ve been operated on they like to get you down into the main surgical wards as there are more staff around to keep an eye on you. I still didn’t know what time the operation would be and wouldn’t be able to find out until the surgeon arrived in the morning.

I took the opportunity to spend the next few minutes chilling out, watching the sun set over the River Thames. The next update to my blog would be after the operation. It would probably be at least Tuesday before I would be in a fit state to type further entries.

Into the unknown……..but what a view.

Thames - Upstream from Howard Ward
The view from Howard Ward – looking upstream towards Battersea

Monday, 11th October 2010 – PRE OP

I was amazed that I managed to get some sleep. I was woken up at 2:00am by one of the nurses to connect a new drip and then went back to sleep. The next time I woke it was a glorious autumn morning. One of the house doctors came in, introduced himself and explained I was the last on the list for surgery as I was the most “interesting” and they didn’t know how long the operation would take. He answered any questions I had and then went off to the operating theatre. I was given DVT stockings and a surgical gown to put on. I lay on the bed watching the sun rise over Millbank.

It's a beautiful day
The sun rising over the old part of St.Thomas’

I was then visited by the anaesthetist. He said that it looked like I would be going down to theatre at 11:00am and it could be a 5 hour operation. There were some formalities that he needed to run through which revolved around risks and consent forms. He explained that they intended to use an epidural for pain control. Whilst this had proved very effective there were a number of risks involved. He went through each one in turn and gave me the probability of each occurring. At the end of it I signed a consent form that confirmed I understood the risks and I was prepared to go ahead with the operation.