What influences your attitude to your health?

Do you think that the job you do influences the attitude you adopt to your health condition(s)?

For the last 35 years, or so, I’ve been planning things. Think party planning but without the sex, drugs and rock’n’roll. To be precise I’ve been planning a whole range of projects ranging from construction jobs, offshore wind farms, defence contracts and the mega Channel Tunnel. The last few years were spent planning the major upgrade to the London Undergound system allowing the introduction of the air-conditioned, walk-through trains on the District, Circle and Metropolitan Lines. (If you use them I hope you enjoy the experience).

 

The job has been challenging, especially when tackling new areas as you need to quickly learn a myriad of acronyms, technical terms and understand the new processes needed to deliver a successful outcome. The standard planning tool is the bar chart, or Gantt chart to give it its fancy name, but the key is always communication. That’s where my love of diagrams comes from. If you can encapsulate on a single page the message you are trying to get across it is so much easier for others to understand than reading reams of words.

 

After many quiet “health” years everything stepped up a gear
in 2010 and over the course of the next 24 months I was faced with multiple outpatient appointments, procedures and a growing number of health conditions. It dawned on me that my health could be considered a “project” and the techniques I had been using for years could be effectively employed to manage it. The follow-up letters or medical reports often contained acronyms or very long, very unfamiliar medical terms and when I obtained copies of all my medical records I reached information overload.

 

The “project” approach (and starting a blog) has enabled me to become very objective about health issues. I see my consultants/NHS as a set of expert resources that will help to achieve a successful outcome. But, of course, there lies a problem. What is a successful outcome? For a conventional project there is a clearly defined point at which it can be declared finished but for a chronic condition, such as Crohn’s, there is at present no end in sight. That makes me uneasy as I’m used to completing a project and then moving on to the next one. (My wife would not agree when it comes to home DIY but that’s just a man thing).

 

Maybe this isn’t just a chronic illness issue but also age related. When you reach a certain point in your life mortality surfaces as an issue. You start to realise that there’s more behind you than in front. If you’re an actuary then you may have already calculated when your use of the term “midlife crisis” is valid. For the rest of us, without access to the actuarial tables, we can only guess and ask our consultants that question that they can’t answer – “is it Crohn’s that will finish me off or is there an even bigger elephant in the room?”

 

Returning to the original question – do you think your job influences your attitude? Maybe I’ve got this completely the wrong way round and the question should be – do you think your attitude to life and your condition influences the job that you do?

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