Category Archives: IBD Community

Meeting People

THAT WAS THEN….

Up until 2010 I had only ever met 2 other people with Crohn’s Disease – a work colleague in 1992 and a neighbour a couple of years later. I had deliberately avoided joining any patient groups. Why would I want to go out of my way to mix with a load of “sick people”?

After initial surgery I had spent long periods in remission and never had a flare-up bad enough to be hospitalised. My only contact with Planet IBD was when I saw a consultant, sometimes six monthly, yearly or longer. My only knowledge of what it was like to live with Crohn’s was from personal experience.

Then in 2010, with surgery beckoning, I started using SoMe and suddenly I found the online IBD Community and “met” lots of Crohn’s patients, albeit in cyberspace. I then went on to meet a couple of them for a coffee.

….BUT THIS IS NOW

I recently had the privilege of taking part in a patient workshop. So what happens when a small group of Crohn’s patients get together, not virtually, but sitting round a table to discuss the cost of the disease to the patient? (and not forgetting the valuable contribution of one patient on speaker phone)? A number of things :

The barriers and taboos of “normal” conversation go out of the window. No subject is off limits. Any embarrassment disappears.

It quickly becomes obvious that whilst we share many of the same experiences, we all have a unique take on the disease and the way we cope with it.

The atmosphere is one of empathy and not judgement.

My overriding thought, having listened to everyone’s story, was what an amazing thing the human body is. The pain and heartache it can inflict upon us but also its ability to survive against all the odds. Even more remarkable is the human spirit and how it copes with a failing body and the mental anguish that a chronic disease can bring with it.

I also learnt some very specific things such as what a Hickman line is or why some patients have a Portacath or what it is like trying to claim support payments.

At the end of the workshop one of the non-Crohn’s participants said that until you do this sort of exercise you cannot understand how all encompassing living with Crohn’s is or, for that matter, any chronic disease.

I’m looking forward to the follow-up workshop later in the year.

…as an added bonus we were given a guided tour around the Bowel & Cancer Research laboratories by one of their very enthusiastic pharmacologists who explained some of the research projects underway

Bowel & Cancer Research Laboratory
Tissue samples undergoing tests

Pavlov’s Dog and Vlogs

First published 5th April 2016

This post was prompted by an #IBDChat in which conversations were mainly about the physical aspects of IBD but at the end of the chat we moved onto the psychological aspects. It does seem to be an area that needs more open discussion both inside and outside the IBD community. For some sufferers the psychological effects may be even more debilitating than the physical ones.

I have used the hashtag #crohnspatterned to describe how I feel Crohn’s has affected me. When I checked to see if the tag had been used by anyone else it turned out to be unique. I’m sure the phenomenon is far from unique and will affect sufferers of other chronic conditions as well.

Let me make it clear that I have escaped pretty lightly both physically and mentally but the experience has been enough for me to realise how things could escalate. I’m starting to feel that Crohn’s now has me patterned like Pavlov’s Dog.

(Just in case anyone is unfamiliar with the story of Pavlov’s dog  here’s a three sentence version. Pavlov was a Russian psychologist born in 1849. As part of an experiment he found that it was possible to condition a dog to associate the sound of a bell with receiving food. The dog, eventually, would salivate at the sound of the bell in anticipation of the food.)

I have a variety of “bells” which act to trigger my digestive system into action, unfortunately we’re not just talking saliva.  The main triggers are the alarm in the morning; that chiming sound on public transport that heralds the “this train is about to be delayed for an indeterminate time” announcement; the sound of my car starting as I am about to embark on a long journey.  So far I have been able to control the effects by extra Loperamide capsules (Imodium) and mind over matter but I can envisage a time when they simply are not enough. Maybe this is all linked to having a “second brain” in our gastrointestinal systems and the triggers are affecting it.

Vlogging

I made a comment on the #IBDChat that I find the use of words such as “poo” and “pooping” when discussing IBD rather demeans the subject and makes it appear less serious than it is. Just my opinion. You may or may not agree but that leads me neatly onto….

I will admit to preferring the medium of blogging to vlogging. Why? Because I can read and concentrate on the content without being distracted by the colour of the curtains in the background or the appearance of the vlogger, etc. Maybe it’s a generational thing as selfies don’t do a lot for me either. Whatever.

A fellow IBDer asked me if I’d ever watched any of the IBD vlogs on YouTube and I had to admit that I hadn’t. They asked me to have a look at a particular one and asked my opinion of it. Now I am not stupid enough to name that vlog here or what the subject was. I don’t want to start some internecine spat within the IBD Community but. ….

I found the vlog, hit play and sat back to be educated or enlightened. After a few seconds I started to ask myself if it was a joke or some kind of spoof. I discounted irony. I kept watching. It made me feel uneasy and I started wondering what benefit it added to our IBD world. If this was meant to be adding to the cause of IBD awareness then it failed.

If you are going to make an IBD vlog then please make it relevant and don’t cheapen the subject. Nuff said. Can’t see myself making one anytime soon.