Category Archives: Crohn’s comorbidities

Viva la Vedo

Monday 15th April 2019 – Guy’s Hospital – Gastroenterology

The Vedolizumab Decision

(This post records an important discussion prior to the next stage of my Crohn’s treatment)

The gastro clinic at GSTT is a victim of its own success. Once a patient gets referred there they invariably don’t want to return to their original hospital. As a result clinics run late. I guess they must be overbooked to cope with the numbers. But forewarned is forearmed so I always take something to read. Having registered with reception I settled down with my book. A nurse appeared and apologised that the doctors were running 75 minutes late. I wondered if there would have time to go and get a chest x-ray (booked some while ago). It was worth a try. Ten minutes later I was back in the outpatients’ waiting area with the x-ray complete. Excellent service.

When you get called into the “inner” waiting room you know it won’t be too long until you see the consultant. I asked the nurse to put a note on my folder that I wished to see my usual doctor. After a few minutes he was calling my name. As I entered the consulting room I had a list of questions in my hand as an aide-memoire.

Capsule Endoscopy Report

He asked if I had received a copy of the capsule endoscopy report. Yes, but didn’t know what I was looking at He worked his way through the document stopping at any frames of interest – “that looks like an ulcer, and there, and that’s one…..” – the conclusion was mild to moderate inflammation in my small bowel. I asked whether it was possible to work out location of inflammation as I get a pain across my midriff,  just above my belly button. He did not expect that to be where pain would be apparent. I mentioned it seemed worse when wearing a tight belt and explained about the hernia that had been found a couple of weeks previously and how it hurt more since surgeon had “poked around”. Normally a hernia would be put right in a simple operation but due to varices growing in abdomen the surgeon was not happy to proceed. I had added it to my “on-hold” list – cholecystectomy; hernia repair.

Next he ran down the results of my recent blood test. “You’ve had chickenpox but not glandular fever as no antibodies are present, oh and you haven’t got AIDS but you probably knew that”. I replied that I had a very bad bout of glandular fever at the beginning of my ‘A’ levels, which accounted for why I did so badly. Maybe antibodies disappear over time. I was pleased to see that my Hb had now risen to 11.8. There was another test, looking at protein bands, one of which was marked “insufficient sample provided” which I thought strange as the phlebotomist had taken nine, full to the top, phials last time. I would need need to give a further sample after the appointment.

I outlined my reticence about starting Vedo :

  • Having been Crohn’s drug free for nearly 8 years I was hesitant to re-start
  • Side effects
  • Co-morbidities
  • Infusions. Whilst I like trips to London (at the moment) I might not do so as I get even older

What could happen if I decided not to start Crohn’s drugs? The worst outcome would be the inflammation becoming so advanced that the bowel could perforate or form fistulas and result in emergency surgery. Given that I should try to avoid surgery this sounded like a risk not worth taking.

The side effect profile of Vedo is very good and it is proving very successful. A recent study into its use with Ulcerative Colitis showed better results than expected. I said that I had seen some slides from that presentation as a member of the audience had posted them on Twitter. He seemed a little surprised at this but added “I do talk a lot!

Is Vedo compatible with my co-morbidities – bile acid malabsorption; portal hypertension; thrombocytopenia; gallbladder issues. I do have rather a lot of them. He told me not to be concerned about them and that I must be made of stern stuff as there were many patients at my age who were in a considerably worse state!

With regards to travelling for infusions, a self administered version of Vedo, using compressed air rather than a needle, has been developed and will undergo 2 years of trials. It should be available in 3 years time then no more infusions.

I asked in light of the calprotectin tests, suggesting the inflammation started early in 2016,  if I should have had a capsule endoscopy sooner than October 2018 ”  His response was that the first place to look following raised calprotectin results is large bowel. My colonoscopy was negative. The subsequent small bowel MRI also showed no inflammation. However given my experience he was now favouring earlier intervention with a capsule for other patients.

How would we measure the efficacy of the drug? Regular calprotectin tests throughout the year and at the end of the first twelve months a capsule endoscopy and small bowel MRI. The one thing I didn’t clarify is whether Vedo is taken to get one into remission and then continues as a maintenance dose or if anther drug is then substituted.

I said that I wanted to discuss the situation with my wife before making a final decision but was leaving the consultation with a lot more positive thoughts about Vedo than when we started. How would I give the go ahead? “Contact the IBD Helpline and take it form there“. With that we shook hands,  I bade him farewell and headed for the blood test room.

Having weighed up the pros and the cons, and with the additional imperative of avoiding surgery (if at all possible) it would seem to be a no-brainer that I should at least try Vedo to get me back into remission before serious damage is done to my gut.

Now where’s that IBD Helpline number……

 

Whip It Out?

St.Thomas’ Hospital – Outpatients’ waiting area in Gassiott House

Friday 10th November 2017 – St.Thomas’ Hospital

My second appointment with the Upper GI surgeon to discuss a cholecystectomy. For some reason I was convinced it was at 10:40am and had arranged to be in Whitechapel at 1:00pm to attend a medical research meeting. When the text message reminder came through it showed the appointment was actually booked for 11:40am. If the clinic was running late then it could be a rush to get the other side of London on time.

I arrived early at St.Thomas’ so that I could drop off a sample at the path lab for calprotectin testing and to call into the Endoscopy Unit to ask why they had written to me about booking a procedure that had already been carried out the previous week.

When I arrived at the Outpatients Waiting Area I worked out that as long as the clinic was running within 30 minutes of the alloted times I should be OK. The large screen showed the clinic was indeed running “approx 30 minutes late”. My definition of “approx 30 minutes late” does not stretch to over an hour, which is when my name finally appeared telling me which room to go to.

The surgeon apologised for the delay and for facing away from me as he read my notes on his PC. He asked how I was feeling. I explained that I was still getting the pain/ache on my right hand side but I believed it to be from scar tissue/adhesions after my ileostomy reversal. He asked if it the pain was worse when my bowels were full. I confirmed that it was and he replied that this tied in with my theory.

He ran through the results of the recent MRI Pancreas scan. It showed that no further gallstones had made their way into my biliary duct and that there was slight thickening of the gallbladder wall. More worryingly varices had grown around the gallbladder. He explained that this was to be expected due to the blockage of my portal vein and the blood flow needing to find alternative routes. The presence of these veins would make potential surgery more hazardous.

They had discussed my case in their Multi Disciplinary Meeting at St.Thomas’ but there was no clear cut decision on whether surgery should go ahead. He wanted to further discuss my case at a meeting with his liver specialist colleagues at Kings College Hospital.

I explained that I wasn’t against surgery, per se, but whilst I was feeling fit and generally well I would rather postpone it until absolutely necessary. We went on to discuss the risks of waiting. The major one being a further blockage of the biliary duct which could lead to pancreatitis (serious).

He stated that in a “normal” patient, with no other complications, the usual treatment would be removal of the gallbladder by keyhole surgery. Because of my concurrent conditions and previous surgery it would not be possible to use keyhole techniques. The choices therefore were to operate now to prevent a problem in the future “that might never happen” or to postpone the decision and review again in 6 months time. He was minded to go with this second option and that was also my preference.

I asked if, in the meantime, there were any measures I should take such as the adoption of a special diet. He replied that this would be appropriate if I was overweight but that was clearly not the case. I also asked about whether I should be avoiding alcohol. He said that he didn’t see any need for this providing I did everything in moderation, after all “life is for living!”

He handed me a 6 month follow-up request form to hand into reception but said if I needed to see him sooner then not to hestitate to call their senior nurse co-ordinator who would make the necessary arrangements. With that the consultation was over. He shook my hand and said goodbye

I left St.Thomas’ at exactly 1:00pm. Big Ben was chiming the hour as I made my way towards Westminster Bridge. 35 minutes later I arrived at my meeting which proved fascinating and enlightening.

When I thought back to my appointment I realised there were a number of questions that I had intended to ask. I will put them in an email to the co-ordinator :

How long is the waiting time for elective surgery?

How long is likely recovery/recuperation time from open surgery?

Please could I have a copy of the MRI Pancreas scan report?

Was the appointment that had recently come through from the Haemophilia Unit as a result of the Multi Disciplinary Meeting?

Next visit to St.Thomas’ – 19th December 2017 for my pre-Christmas esophageal varices check up. This will be my tenth endoscopy since late 2012. The taste of the burnt banana spray doesn’t get any easier to bear