Old Dog, New Tricks

A post because of Crohn’s, not about it.

Whatever else you can say about Crohn’s Disease it certainly does give you the chance of new experiences, mostly unpleasant, to be honest. I won’t list the nasty ones here as they are covered in the video at the end of this post. I thought I’d record how I dealt with this opportunity in case others get a similar chance to raise awareness of IBD.

It’s something I’d wanted to do for a while. I suppse it stems from a reawakening of the “performing” instinct that first showed itself when I was  in a band. That was around the time I was diagnosed with Crohn’s.

mav_lak_2In this instance I really wasn’t sure what to expect. A fellow patient at St. Thomas’ Hospital was due to talk to some undergraduate nurses, about “Living with IBD”, but then found that they were double booked that day. Would I step in and do it instead? Of course I would, after all how difficult would it be to talk to a few nurses? The date was set for 5 weeks time.

I wouldn’t need any preparation. I’d lived with IBD long enough to write a book. I would just turn up and talk, or so I thought. The last thing I wanted was to read from a script but, after some more thinking, decided the least I should list out all the topics that needed discussing.

Years ago I dismissed mind maps as more “management clap trap” and then actually drew one and have been sold on them ever since. It would help clarify my thinking. Here’s what I came up with :

mind_mapAt this point  I found out that there would be around 200 nurses, in a proper lecture theatre and  I would be talking at the end of the afternoon. It dawned on me that to do the subject justice, and not short change the nurses, I would at least need some notes and something to keep everyone awake. I tried doing a run through, just using notes, and it was terrible – stilted, hesitant, repetitive…..  I would have to write the talk out word-for-word, the very thing I didn’t want to do.

I find that simply reading through what I have written doesn’t pick up the likes of over used words or even ones that are missing. Much better to hear it being read. I found that the software I use has the facility to convert the text to speech and save it as an audio file in iTunes. I can then listen to it on my iPod.

After several iterations, including two read throughs to my wife, I was finally happy with the contents. Maybe if I then listened to it endlessly it would become engrained in my memory and I would not need notes.

After half-a-dozen listenings it hadn’t worked. I would have to work from a script after all…..

When I got to the theatre, with a real live audience, it suddenly became a lot easier. I did use the notes but just to make sure I didn’t forget anything (which I still did). I had taken a small camera with me but unfortunately didn’t get there in time to set it up properly so the sound wasn’t brilliant.

The resulting video was rather long, all in one go, so I’ve split it into three parts. Of the three I think that the second one covering surgery and stomas is the most representative. I’ll let you judge the result.

Kings College Hospital, Lecture Theatre

A little further down the road?

5th September 2016 – Gastro Appointment – Guy’s Hospital – 10:20am

…the story so far can be found in the post “Crying Wolf”

Today’s appointment was to get the results of the MRI scan I had five weeks, or so, ago and then work out the way forward to get my health back on track.

It was the first appointment following my retirement so no chance to just leave the office for an hour to attend. It would need a special trip and chance to suffer the reduced timetable operated by Southern Rail. Having left home in plenty of time I arrived at Guy’s only two minutes before the due time. Almost immediately my name was called for me to be weighted. I had lost around 6 kilos since my last appointment. I asked the nurse to put a note on my records that I wanted to see my usual doctor. “No problem”.

Being weighed allows you into the inner sanctum, the inner waiting area, from where you are collected by your consultant. A student approached me and asked if I would be prepared to take part in some genetics based IBD research. I’m always more than happy to help so he left me a document to read and would talk to me after I had seen the consultant.

The waiting area was remarkably quiet. It’s been jam packed on previous visits and I’ve waited over an hour to be called. I’ve been preparing to give a talk on “Living with IBD” as part of a lecture for undergraduate nurses on chronic conditions. I had intended to do it completely off the cuff but I have come to the conclusion that is unrealistic. I’ve written out what I want to stay and the software has then converted it to speech so that I can listen to it on my iPod. This seemed like a good time to give it another listen.

I was miles away, submerged in the narrative about weight loss and fatigue in IBD, and then realised my name was being called. It was my consultant. I apologised for appearing to be on another planet and we made our way into the consulting room. By now it was 10:50am.

I had my obligatory list of questions with me :

  1. Results of colonoscopy 13th July 2016 – “ongoing mild colonic Crohn’s Disease. Previous colonoscopy” – 25th February 2015 – “mild, patchy erythema throughout the colon, however no ulceration seen”. Has there been a change? Does it need to be treated?
  1. Results of MRI scan?
  1. BAM – could this be causing weight loss etc. Treatment – Questran (low tolerance) Colesevelam.
  1. Blood test organised for 2 weeks. Have asked for cholesterol to be checked

Starting with the 1) it did suggest that the Crohn’s has returned albeit mildly. I mentioned that my last calprotectin level had been elevated – around 425. He called up all my results and drew a graph which showed that the last result did not follow the trend. “Collect a sample pot on your way out and we’ll re-run the test in case that was a rogue value. Let me know when you drop the sample in so that I can keep an eye out for the result.”

I asked about potential drugs to treat the inflammation. (Usually I would have been kept on a maintenance dose of Azathioprine but the onset of thrombocytopenia back in 2008 had made this a non-starter). He explained that there were drugs that specifically targetted the colon that were used to treat ulcerative colitis. He mentioned a form of Budesonide. I have subsequently looked this up and found a NICE document about Budesonide multi-matrix (MMX/Cortiment). It is formulated to release at a controlled rate throughout the colon to minimise systemic absorption. The licensed dose is 9 mg in the morning, for up to 8 weeks. It was licensed in October 2014 for inducing remission in mild to moderate active ulcerative colitis in adults for whom aminosalicylate treatment is not sufficient.

2) What did the MRI scan show? Strictures in my colon but they hadn’t shown up on the colonoscopy. Usually a colonoscopy trumps an MRI scan so this was an unexpected result. He proposed to take the results of both to the next MDM (multi-disciplinary meeting) to try and come up with an explanation.

It also showed adhesions but the fact they existed was not news. Since shortly after my reversal I had been complaining of an ache around the anastomosis .

3) Given the very variable nature of my digestive system and my recent weight loss I wondered if it was finally time to bite the bullet and start taking a sequestrant to treat my severe bile acid malabsorption. I had been fighting shy of taking yet more drugs and have been controlling it Loperamide.

I asked if it would be possible to prescribe Colesevelam (the tablet form) rather than Questran (powders) as I had read many reports of the former being easier to tolerate. I was aware of the cost differential, a factor of 10. He said that for the good of the health service budget I should try the Questran first but this would be a discussion for me and my GP.

4) I mentioned that I had a blood test organised for a couple of weeks time and would send the results through to him. I had asked for a cholestrol check to be carried out.

He would organise my next appointment once the MDM had discussed my results. He then took me back to the student doing the genetic study and I spent 10 minutes answering questions and spitting (saliva into a sample tube).

Where did that get me?

I’ve learnt about the possibility of a new drug to treat the inflammation in my colon and I’ve set in motion potentially directly treating the BAM. I think I’ll leave the decision on that one until my next appointment when we have an answer on colonoscopy/MRI scan conflict.

…and in the meantime an old client has called me up to see if I would be free to do some work for them. Retirement will have lasted precisely 5 weeks…